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20100401
20100430
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Book TV 29
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CSPAN2 29
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English 29
Search Results 0 to 28 of about 29 (some duplicates have been removed)
CSPAN
Apr 18, 2010 7:45pm EDT
and falls into blue ridge along that creek at highway and back into black mountain virginia. and yesterday, in the same area of southwestern virginia and two eastern kentucky, they dropped 3 million pounds of ammonium nitrate fuel explosives to blow up our mountain. blow up our mountains, 500 mountains destroyed 1.2 million acres destroyed to reach in and in a very effective way with heavy equip and operators, to pull the coal and floated up to the train and destroy the communities in the watershed, to poison the community and the watershed. that and black mountain virginia, where you get your coal, a few years ago a young boy was sleeping in his house, the davidson family, and explosions went off in a night like tonight. and every time i flicked my life which i think what happened on black mountain and came down on my presents from southern illinois and the flat rock plant last into the home and crashed a 3-year-old and killed him. and that criminal activity is not abolished, but it's regulated, today by her administration. and that criminal activity is loaded onto the train and it's not
CSPAN
Apr 25, 2010 11:00pm EDT
into a national issue. borders books and music in virginia coasts this 45 minute talk. >> i'm going to give you a little snipp from the book and leave lots of time for questions. if you want to sit there are three seats up there. it's not going to be as entertaining as not sitting down. [laughter] after a long road through personal and professional setbacks, john mohammed accompanied by lee malveaux arrived in montgomery county maryland and early october, 2002. having already killed five people and wounded several others in a month-long arc of robbery and revenge from washington state through the southwest and the south that included interludes in maryland the to snipers begin the rampage the withdrawal worldwide attention with an air and shot through a michaels craft store on october 2nd, 2002. later that day they would kill their first person and the next day five more. nearly all in the confines of montgomery county maryland. over the next three weeks for more murders and three unsuccessful attempts to place with woundings mainly in virginia between d.c. and richmond. but concluding back in
CSPAN
Apr 10, 2010 8:00am EDT
just over the river, in to west virginia tonight across eastern kentucky and over the river and i'm going to be reading from a piece about judy bonds, and it is titled "the endangered hill billy." there's a heaviness that hangs over the town of west virginia. like the fog from the nearby big coal river, it seeps through the streets, past the empty store front, on up the mountainside to the rows of house that is overlook the town. it has become the invisible resident, a testament to the flight that has taken place over the years, even as the profits of the mining industry have soared. many of the buildings on the main street are vacant, pocked by broken windows, boarded up with plywood. only a few businesses barely hold on, an auto shop, a law office, a motel. the sign for a local diner boa boasts hot fried baloney sandwiches. inside, a handful of people gather at the counter for their midday dinner. one can hear the exhaustion. people are tired, although the town is located within boone county, the leading coal producing city in the state, nearly 30% of residents live below the po
CSPAN
Apr 17, 2010 7:00pm EDT
accepted this invitation and am very grateful to virginia but what they don't know is i am mostly accepted the invitation because it gives me an opportunity too actually interact with cornel west who is so big and busy that he is not sufficiently available so here we are thrown together into this conversation but in all seriousness i think one of the things that is wonderful about the gathering is it allows us to consider people who are behind bars and to acknowledge them not only as a part of our humanity but also their membership of our social body. the book that is celebrated today "jailhouse lawyers" is a vote of addition to a growing literature that makes clear there is firebrand life behind bars. not solely in violence exploitive programs you may have seen on television but the act that we have deliberately as a society made of intellectually able individuals who toil and trouble under difficult circumstances to prove they are human. and before we go on to the larger subject i realize mumia abu-jamal was the subject of the conversation but as a social anthropologist at princeton let
CSPAN
Apr 10, 2010 8:00pm EDT
. at the time of loving versus virginia, in 1967 amazingly late, 16 states both prohibited and punished marriage across racial lines for the more all the states were required to honor divorces' performed in other states that had a more lenient divorce, residence requirements than their own that was not the case with interracial marriage. so it's the only parallel to the defense of marriage act. states that have always against miscegenation refuse to recognize marriage between blacks and whites legally contract elsewhere and the even crawl lies those marriages. the supreme court case that brought about in overturning of antimiscegenation lobbies, loving versus virginia was such a case. madrid, african-american, and richard lyng, quite got married in washington, d.c. in 1958 but their marriage notice in race, too, d.c. was in the vanguard, this interesting. their marriage, however, was not recognized as legal in their home state of virginia. when they return they were arrested in the middle of the light in their own bedroom with a framed copy of their marriage certificate hanging over their bed an
CSPAN
Apr 11, 2010 11:00pm EDT
in virginia that we know of and also a spy who carried messages from london to paris to benjamin franklin and used false heels on his boots to carry the message. washington's deceptions. the one thing i do have to say about washington for somebody who never told a lie he stretched the truth an awful lot. [laughter] up at cambridge when he first six over the american army, they were down 29 rounds her man. nine shots were bad as it does for as the gunpowder in camp. he knew there were british spies going around the american camping so he had a shipment of barrels brought up from providence rhode island marked gunpowder the only problem is in said the barrels was say and. the british spies would go back and report that the americans had plenty of gunpowder and they could keep the cs for a long time. he also did a troop multiplication at morristown after the battles of trenton and princeton the camps at morristown and while there normally putting most of the troops in cluster in houses to keep as many together as you could. washington with the opposite way but wonder to soldiers and a house
CSPAN
Apr 25, 2010 11:00am EDT
to virginia. michael, good morning. a republican. >> caller: yes, how are you this morning? >> host: doing fine. go ahead with your comment. >> caller: hey, i'm very grateful for all this young man is saying. let me say this, i worked on the maybe campaign and i was over seven counties in west virginia, okay? and i understand where you're coming from about, you know, mccain not being a conservative and the ground game and everything. but we also need to place some blame on young people or whoever was working in the field that didn't take their own initiative. i had -- i started an internship and had 27 interns from james madison university. no one told me to do that. i did that on my own accord. and so, therefore, you have to -- the ground game has to be creative. and do their own thing. and know how to bring people in. so you can't totally blame it on maybe. i think a lot of it has to do with the people on the ground that you got working for you and how professional they are. >> guest: well, a lot has to be pinned on mccain. i mean, his ground game has the -- should have the resources. ob
CSPAN
Apr 10, 2010 10:00am EDT
thought that what happened in the 1960 election in illinois and west virginia had a major impact on president nixon's attitudes towards the powers that be as the need and what have you. and did you have any conversations regarding, i believe his top lawyers at the time wanted him to challenge the electoral count in illinois which would have given him the presidency. but from what i've known i had an indirect conversation, second party conversation with the president background 1966. his reasoning for not challenging that election, i believe was a would have torn the country apart in a time in the '60s when we had a very series problem with nuclear confrontation with the russian. and if you would, please, give me your thoughts, any conversations, and maybe that made him a little better to the press and what have you, because of the stolen election. >> guest: yes, that's a good summary of the situation. and nixon's position was indeed that it would be too divisive if he did so. what was never really fully reported is yes, there were problems in the chicago area, but what never got
CSPAN
Apr 12, 2010 7:00am EDT
of the private businesses in the suburbs, northern virginia and maryland. in an area like washington, d.c., for example, they are expanding the metro. out in northern virginia and then they are expanding the metro in the maryland suburbs. from what i gathered you would be against that due to your idea that public transportation has not yet paid for itself? >> it's a fact. public transportation in general -- now, there is one i will say that has really done a fine job when it comes to public transportation. if i may say this, this isn't technically public transit, amtrak which has been federally subsidized. it too is not doing very well but the route from d.c. to new york is doing quite fine because, a, it's -- it's not a, heavily federally subsidized and more privately owned by amtrak and b, because people use it. >> my thought with eminent domain, my thought on eminent domain. do you support that idea and if that, in fact, is a government takeover by public land. >> that's a great question. i have a whole section on eminent domain and different court cases addressing eminent domain iss
CSPAN
Apr 18, 2010 6:30am EDT
is a follow-up to a conversation virginia and i had with mark. i want to refer you all to his amazing website. it's full of very important resources on this case. and the issues that concern mumia. the question that we gravitated towards this morning that i would like to put into this room is of contextualizing the struggle for mumia's rights in a post-9/11 climate of the politics of fear and in what way the struggle has met new challenges. and how we think of meeting those particular ones. if you want to reflect on some of those aspects. >> well, i think in many wades, though, it's both 9/11 but also in the age of obama. i think that 9/11 took place during the age of reagan. it was a very, very different moment. well, it was the age of reagan but bush was a representative. actually, there's elements of carter and clinton that were elements of the age of reagan in terms of punitive policies when it comes to prison, in terms of eliminating and welfare and pushing persons oftentimes that let their entree into the industrial complex. it was the clinton administration decision that helped facilit
CSPAN
Apr 25, 2010 9:00am EDT
and virginia beach, virginia,. >> was there anything else that you consulted in writing this book other than his rules? >> boy, that is a great question. you know, i think democracy in america i likes us, was one of the great books of all time. and i think some of the core principles of what american democracy is about are reflected in this movement. and so i think that was probably the other book that was most influential. >> thank you very much for your time. >> sure. >> public service, is one of the great innovations in american political and broadcasting history. thanks. >> will talk now with jonathan krohn, if he is all right with that. can you tell us how's it going with a new book? tells with the new book is about. >> it's about basic and modern america. >> what does that mean to you? >> well in the book i really, i really discuss how there are so many different types of views, neoconservatism, pay your conservatism, social conservatism, all these different groups that but there are four things i think that unite them. for the constitution, respect for human life, limited government a
CSPAN
Apr 17, 2010 9:45am EDT
virginia. was widely known by americans across all races and classes at the time. he wanted to attack segregation in a way that, of course, would be successful, the law of the land at the time was plessy v. ferguson, a 19th century supreme court decision that established the doctrine of separate but equal. and those words never appear in the decision to be sure, but the law was that so long as states, so long as the government provides separate and equal facilities for african-americans and for white americans, the constitution is satisfied. houston could not walk into court and ask a district court judge to overturn separate but equal. it would not work. the district court judge result is to have authority to do so. and secondly it was the way individuals live their lives. so the question became how was he going to attack this? and i would just like to briefly read two paragraphs here, and i see two paragraphs because the legal strategy was so brilliant in its simplicity that it can be summarized in a very short number of words your of voters case is a ship. is wind is the law that h
CSPAN
Apr 10, 2010 9:00am EDT
to washington from stand in, virginia. it was very impressive. here was of this very tall, handsome figure who you would walk down the senate's corridors with him and he would create a white with the various police people and other people giving way. he would take us around the senate and he drove a 1957 at that time thunderbird that was geared up like it was the cockpit of an airplane. it had more gadgets and stuff. for teenage boys, he was a great figure and a charismatic person for young guy. >> one of the other words that comes a lot is honesty. explained. >> to put it in context, i read the senator's autobiographical works where he had worked with co-authors and i don't think they ever found this material and years later in talking to him he told me he had taken a lot of material he had composed over the years and put it in the arizona historical foundation and when we did another project on was going to look at that and realize, really good stuff in here and it is pure barry goldwater because it is not by speechwriters or a staff person. it is the senator and it goes from a personal diar
CSPAN
Apr 10, 2010 4:00pm EDT
was in manassas, virginia. that was in 2005 with franklin butler. >> secondly, i would like to hear a few remarks about benny's god to raise driver who died last year and how viceroy cigarette sponsored the team and were able to compete on a national level? >> the track championship in 2005, we won the track championship with a white driver, franklin butler and franklin butler, and he had a brother, they were winning drivers at the late-model level and franklin butler even was very competitive and had wins at higher levels. that brings up the point where even some light drivers in nascar, they are pushed out of the sport because they don't have the money to compete because again it is not like basketball or football. franklin brother and his brother brandon butler were one of those drivers. when you are trying to develop a black driver from scratch you have to do it in steps. you can't go out like a white team and just take the bus driver and put them in the car and get instant results were get results in the first or second season. franklin butler was an overqualified driver for that level of ra
CSPAN
Apr 11, 2010 9:00am EDT
dominate. the episcopal church can no longer dominate virginia. so we've got to build coalitions. and the coalitions shift. but in the middle east, it's very hard, because you are loyal to your family and tribe and nobody beyond that. it's curious, when i was growing up in the military, the idea was always, arabs can't fight. well, we didn't -- because we didn't ask ourselves the fundamental question. what do arabs fight for? people fight for different things. arabs don't fight for states. in the arab world, the state was always the enemy. in afghanistan, always -- afghanistan was a city state of kabul. a few thousand years ago, balk, but a city state of kabul, tributary citie -- caravan citis along tributaries. so there was no sense of cooperation, no sense of statehood, no sense of integration, but with arabs, we say arabs can't fight
CSPAN
Apr 17, 2010 11:00pm EDT
magazines such as the virginia quarterly review and the misery we do submitting personal essay some of which are revised in a book about my personal experiences in afghanistan and my thoughts about people they are in the country. i thought normally don't go into a daily story because i'm being more reflect in reporting is. >> give me an example of. >> or example there is one story in the book about some children that we took under her wing so i talked about the process of getting to know them, taking them for lunch everyday and enrolling them in schools and the problems i faced when i left and i had started this process with them and how to continue that because they created an expectation for them that i felt obligated to attempt to fulfill. >> who was funding all these trips? >> some of them were funded out-of-pocket, my pocket and mindy were wanted by knight ridder newspaper. >> this book, "the khaarijee" a chronicle of friendship and war in kabul, what period does it cover? does it cover all seven trips? >> it does, yet. >> walk us through it. >> the initial chapters are just my immersio
CSPAN
Apr 24, 2010 6:30pm EDT
in richmond, virginia, a black hospital. my father was very fortunate because he could find work. in fact, he employed people. he was self-employed all his life. but my mother, being a nurse, was not able to work in any hospital, nor was there a nurses registry that would take a negro at that time. c-span: you say in your book, early on, that you were not aware of prejudice until you were about 12 years old. >> guest: well, i'd had a little experience with it in that one of my little neighbors, who i loved very much, told me one day that she couldn't hold hands and go up the hill or down the hill with me as we went to school, as we had always done, because she found that i was a "nigger." so that was one of -- that was my first shock. but i think -- i lived also with the realization of my mother's feelings about not being able to get the kind of job that she wanted. c-span: but you -- when you got into girl scouts and... >> guest: no, the ywca. c-span: i'm sorry, the ywca -- but the whole business that -- the swimming pool and the ywca in rankin versus the ywca in pittsburgh. >> guest: i had
CSPAN
Apr 24, 2010 9:00pm EDT
virginia. i am understand where you are coming from about mccain not being a conservative and is good ground game and everything but we also need to place the blame on young people or whoever was working in the field that did not take the initiative. if i started my internship with 27 insurance from james madison university. nobody told me to do that but i did that on my own accord. the ground games has to be creative. and know how to bring people when you cannot totally blamed on mccain it passed with people on the ground and how professional they are. >> guest: of lot of it has to be put on to maintain his ground game should have the resources. obama's scene was so cash plus they were taking advertisements out in the "guitar hero" and video games. they rocked the youth are reach ever. want to give the behind-the-scenes effort there's a lot of that conservatives can learn to adopt the tactics because some of them quite frankly are worth adopting. >> host: no surprising young people voted democratic. but if the money is behind the bombing in the 2008 campaign the boats go behind obama
CSPAN
Apr 11, 2010 11:00am EDT
am finishing up a stint at virginia commonwealth university where i taught creative writing in richmond and i'm going on to except a job at the university of richmond in the fall in teaching american studies. >> when jd comes marching home is the name of the book, laura is the author the, sasha is the retired her. >> coming at next come booktv presents after words an hourlong discussion between guest us and the author of a new book. this week jack matlock, ambassador to the soviet union under president reagan, discusses his but "superpower illusions: how myths and false ideolgies led america astray - and how to return to reality". in the book ambassador jack matlock looks at the role played by mikhail gorbachev and been down the soviet empire and argues that president reagan's successor is learned the wrong lessons from the end of the cold war. he's interviewed by dimitri simes, president of the nixon center and publisher of the national interest. ..
CSPAN
Apr 17, 2010 8:30pm EDT
of academic programs, the miller center public affairs at the university of virginia. he is the co-author of many excellent books including the president and the parties and politics of regulatory change. please welcome sidney milkis. [applause] >> good afternoon everybody. thank you so much for coming out on a beautiful day, wednesday afternoon. it is a real honor to be here and an honor to speak before such a distinguished audience, which includes many of my distinguished colleagues in distinguished colleagues and friends. i am not happy that it took me 10 years to write this book, but to some degree it was a labor of love because i have always been interested in how elections and parties have shaped america's constitutional democracy. the 1912 election was one of those rare campaigns that challenge voters to think seriously about their rights and the constitution. it was the climactic rattle of the progressive era vet rose at the dawn of the 20th century when the country burris try to come to terms with the profound challenges posed by the industrial revolution. for 1912 electio
CSPAN
Apr 24, 2010 11:00pm EDT
takes a pillage" firstall from richmond, virginia. good afternoon. please go ahead with your question. >> caller: hey, i wanted to ask with the huge bailout, is there a danger with the devaluation of currency through inflation? >> guest: i think the currency question is good. so far they haven't. part of the reason why is because all of these assets, all of the transactions, all of the markets was very global. so problems that happened on one side that might have emanated from the united states were most of the manufacturing of these assets were taking place and most of the bailouts and the subsidies that fix the market were given out. there's still impacts across the world from having been involved in the products. so like -- technically the dollar shouldn't remain as strong by virtue of the fact that we continue to hold so much money without knowing where they went. they didn't disappear. a lot of them still exist, they are on books. that was exactly how we got into the problem. having money behind them, having debt, having the fed put out a lot of money behind them, only works when
CSPAN
Apr 17, 2010 8:00am EDT
can no longer dominate elections. the episcopal church can no longer dominate virginia. so we got to build coalitions, and a coalition shift. but in the middle east it's very hard because you are loyal to your family and tribe, and no one beyond it. it's curious. when i was going up in the military, arabs can fight. we did ask ourselves the old question, what do arabs fight for? people fight for different things. arabs don't fight for states. in the arab world the state was always the enemy. in afghanistan, not arab of course, always, afghanistan was a city state of kabul. 2000 years ago. the city state of kabul with tributary cities. that's all that mattered. the caravan routes and cities, kept the tribes out. so there was no sense of cooperation, no sense of statehood, no sense of integration. but with arabs we say and can't buy because the israelis. i get a ringside seat for the latter half of the 2006 war. little legs standing watching things go off and tanks firing right beside it, et cetera, up in the northern border. they gave the idf a very hard time. part of it was the id
CSPAN
Apr 17, 2010 3:30pm EDT
of pages and there was a letter from a coal mining family in west virginia. and then the next letter was from a republican, who really just like kennedy. she said she was looking forward to voting against the 1964 was going to be deprived of this opportunity. but in those letters, condolence letters are like condolence letters most of you so far have written. it goes to console the bereaved person, offers some reflections and that's what these letters did. what was in them, i quickly came to see there was much, much more. and what we could see was a snapshot of the country responding to a cataclysmic historical event at a specific moment in time and they were tremendously, to my mind, revealing. so i became convinced that they needed to be brought to life. i was very enthusiastic about this and have enough to to my colleague and i was on leave at the institute and i said i found this a major letters that the museum. but there is one hitch, i have to find these people. the copyright under the copyright lobby sided with the letter writer, even though the letter's are in the national ar
CSPAN
Apr 24, 2010 7:30pm EDT
and that that can be a life that is worth choosing. >> where's your motorcycle shop? >> in richmond, virginia. >> what is it called? >> shot go moto. i work on japanese and european bikes and british bikes as well. these are mostly vintage bikes, vintage cachet that makes people willing to spend some money on them, and it is a very small operation. >> any reason in particular you don't work on harley's? >> yeah, people asked me sometimes why i don't work on harleys and what i generally say is that i work on motorcycles, not lifestyles. i'm just not qualified to help them with their lifestyle issues so it is beyond my competence. >> what is soul craft? >> actually, the title of the book was a play on the title of the book i george will that came out 20 years ago. his was statecraft as soul craft and i thought it was kind of funny to replace shop craft was statecraft. i guess he would define it as something like education, the forming of the soul. >> what does that mean? >> well, we often think of education as in narrow terms as acquiring maybe a narrow and instead of technical skill, but i thi
CSPAN
Apr 17, 2010 10:30am EDT
at the university of virginia center for politics. dr. ernst received his ph.d. from the woodrow wilson school of government and foreign affairs at the university of virginia in the spring of 2000. in his research focuses on the american political system with special attention given to citizen influence on a sub national politics and environmental policy. dr. ernst is best known for his work in the area of environmental politics and is considered a leading author on the chesapeake bay restoration program. beyond his words academic impact, his findings have been highlighted in numerous media outlets including the national public radio and the pbs frontline documentary titled, poison waters. his most recent book is "fight for the bay: why a dark green awakening is needed to save the chesapeake". also we have a orrin pilkey professor emeritus of earth sciences of founder and director emeritus of the program for the study of developed shorelines. within the nicholas school of the environment and earth sciences at duke university. as a result of the destruction of his parents' house, and wav land,
CSPAN
Apr 18, 2010 12:00am EDT
of government and foreign affairs at the university of virginia in the spring of 2000. his research focuses on the american political system with special attention given to citizen influence on subnational politics and environmental policy. dr. ernst is best known for his work in the area of environmental politics and is considered a leading author on the chesapeake bay restoration program. beyond his work academic impacts dr. ernst findings have been violated in numerous media outlets including "the washington post", national public radio's diane reams show and they the pbs frontline documentary titled poisoned waters. his most recent book is fight for that they, why a dark green environmental awakening is needed to save the chesapeake bay. also we have worn pilkey professor emeritus of earth sciences and founder director emeritus of the program for the study of developed shorelines within the nicholas school of game ferment and earth sciences at duke university. as a result of the destruction of his parents house in waveland, mississippi during hurricane camille in 1969 he began the study
Search Results 0 to 28 of about 29 (some duplicates have been removed)